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Frequently Asked Questions

What does CSEA stand for?

Child Support Enforcement Agency

Where is the Butler County CSEA located?

Butler County Government Services Center
315 High Street, 7th floor
Hamilton, Ohio 45011

How can I contact the CSEA?

For assistance on your child support case, you may call, write or email the Butler County CSEA. The agency has several telephone numbers for your convenience: 

Main Number: (513) 887-3362
Middletown Number: (513) 424-5351
Toll Free Number for Ohio Residents: 1-800-542-0806
SETS Voice Response Unit (VRU): 1-800-860-2555 (provides account balance)
Fax: (513) 887-3699
Anonymous Tip Line: (513) 785-5750 or (866) 360-2338

The agency sees clients in-person by appointment ONLY. You can schedule an appointment by calling our customer service number (513-887-3362) or by sending us an email. The agency schedules appointments between 1:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M. on Tuesdays and between 8:30 A.M. and 11:30 A.M on Fridays. 

To make a cash or credit card payment in-person, please visit our payment window located on the 7th floor of the Government Services Center, 315 High Street, Hamilton, OH  45011. The window is open from 7:30 A.M.- 4:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. You do NOT need an appointment to make a payment. The agency's lobby hours also end at 4:00 P.M.
 

What is the cost for services?

The agency’s services are FREE.

Whom can the CSEA help?

The agency’s services are automatically available to all families receiving cash assistance or Medicaid benefits as a participant in the Ohio Works First (OWF) Program through the Department of Job & Family Services. Individuals who receive cash assistance must cooperate with the CSEA in efforts to establish and enforce child support obligations. While on assistance, the CSEA forwards support payments for OWF participants to the state of Ohio.

Butler County residents who are non-recipients of OWF or individuals who no longer live in Butler County but have a Butler County support order, are also eligible for services by simply completing a IV-D application for services.

What is a IV-D case?

The term IV-D comes from Title IV, section D of the Social Security Act, which established the child support enforcement program in 1975. The CSEA opens IV-D cases for all public assistance (welfare) cases involving children not living with one or both parents. The CSEA also offers IV-D services to non-welfare recipients who apply for child support services (locating parents, establishing paternity, establishing child support orders, collecting and distributing child support and enforcing child support orders).

What services does the CSEA provide to the public?

Depending on the nature of your case, the CSEA may be able to provide one or more of the following services:

  • Paternity establishment for children born out-of-wedlock or for whom paternity is still a legal issue
  • Support order establishment
  • Medical order establishment
  • Collection and disbursement of support payments and maintainence of records for such transactions on all Butler County judicial and administrative support orders
  • Support order modification
  • Support and medical order enforcement
  • Issuance of wage withholding orders to assure payment of support obligations. Methods include the attachment and/or withholding from personal earnings, accounts from a financial institution, Social Security disability benefits, unemployment benefits, Worker’s Compensation benefits, retirement benefits, and federal and state income tax refunds and other federal benefits (for child support cases only). Other means of collection may be available depending upon the nature of the support case.
  • Location of individuals who have a duty to pay child support

What is CSPC?

CSPC stands for Child Support Payment Central, a unit created by the state of Ohio to process and disburse child support payments made by check or money order.

How does the CSEA usually collect child support?

The CSEA or court normally sends a wage withholding order to the parent's employer for the amount of the support order, plus the two percent processing charge. The employer then deducts these amounts from the parent's paycheck. The CSEA or court may also issue wage withholding orders to a variety of other sources (Workers' Compensation, Social Security, pensions and annuities). The CSEA or court can also direct the parent to set up an account at a financial institution. A party can also pay the CSEA directly if their payment method is by credit card or cash or they can send a check or money order to CSPC.

Are there any types of cases that the CSEA will not handle?

The CSEA will NOT handle:

  • Visitation issues, including requests for enforcing or establishing visitation rights
  • Determination of a child(ren)’s custody, including requests for changes and/or modifying custody or a change in residential parent
  • Property settlement issues
  • Arresting or physically detaining anyone. The county sheriff is responsible for these actions.
  • Obtaining documents for a case, such as a birth certificate, divorce decree, tax return, or other necessary paperwork. Individuals may obtain these by contacting the appropriate court, health department or taxing entity.

Does the CSEA provide legal representation to me or to any of the other parties in the case?

No. The CSEA and the Prosecuting Attorney represent the state of Ohio and no attorney-client relationship exists between the CSEA or Prosecuting Attorney and the parents or related parties. The payee (i.e., the parent or party providing direct care of the children) and the payer (the parent or party not providing direct care of the children) both have the right to engage private legal counsel.

What should I do if I currently live in Butler County, but have a support order that another Ohio county established?

You should contact the CSEA in the Ohio county that established the support order.

What should I do if I currently live in Butler County, but I have a support order that a court or agency in another state issued?

You can contact the Butler County CSEA and apply for child support services. Depending on the rules and regulations of the other state, you may also be able to contact the other state for service.

When contacting the CSEA, what information should I have available?

Depending on the nature of your situation, the agency may need the following information:

  • Name and address of the parent who is obligated to pay support, as well as the person receiving the support payments
  • Copies of the child(ren)’s birth certificate
  • The names and addresses of the payer's current or recent employer or sources of income
  • The names and addresses of the payer's friends and relatives who the parent may have contact with
  • Information about the income and other assets of the payer, including but not limited to: copies of pay stubs, tax returns, bank accounts, investments, property holdings and professional licenses
  • If paternity is an issue, the names and addresses and any other relevant information on all presumed and alleged fathers
  • Copies of court orders
  • Social Security numbers of the parties

What if I have a case with the Butler County CSEA and I move?

You must inform the CSEA by sending an emailor letter. Be sure to include your case number and name. Submitting a change of address to the Post Office will not change your address with the CSEA.

 Glossary of Child Support Terms


   



Butler County CSEA | Executive Director William Morrison | Assistant Director Narka Gray 
Government Services Center, 7th Floor, Hamilton, OH 45011

Phone (513) 887-3362 | Fax (513) 887-3699

Board of Commissioners: Donald L. Dixon, T.C. Rogers, Cindy Carpenter